Health IT

Women are out-earning their male counterparts in the role of chief information officer in the healthcare field, according to a new salary report from the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME).

U.K. residents will soon be able to utilize their Amazon Alexa voice technology to get certain medical information, after the National Health Service (NHS) struck a partnership with Amazon.

UC Health, an integrated academic health system based in Cincinnati, has named its first vice president and chief data and analytics officer. The creation of the executive position reflects the rising importance of data-driven strategies in healthcare organizations.

Social media networks like Facebook and YouTube are seeing a wave of false medical information about dubious cancer treatments, with millions of views, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The University of Chicago and Google are facing a class action lawsuit after one former patient at UChicago’s medical center accused the institution of sharing patient records and violating privacy rights.

Uber Health recently teamed up with Carisk Partners, a specialty risk transfer and care coordination provider, to reduce travel complications of getting to the doctor.

CVS Health has launched a new platform that allows its pharmacy benefit management (PBM) clients to contract, implement and manage their health and wellness solutions.

UnityPoint Health, a hospital network based in the Midwest, is stepping up to invest in digital health and healthcare services solutions with a new $100 million venture fund, UnityPoint Health Ventures Innovation Fund.

Healthcare organizations are keeping an eye on technology behemoths, which are the new entrants and competitors in the healthcare industry.

An emergence of fake medical news and untrustworthy medical advice on social media has led to the creation of a new type of role at Jefferson Health, a health system in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

 

Proposed rules to mitigate one of the biggest obstacles to value-based care––interoperability––and provide patients with access to their own health information for free are being met with privacy and security concerns from industry stakeholders.

Electronic wearables that can monitor heart rates, steps and more vital signs are becoming more prevalent across the healthcare space, but the use of these devices is not all on the up and up. Instead of helping people stay on track with their health goals, meticulously tracking symptoms can actually sometimes make them feel worse, Wired reported.