Hospital-level care at home can reduce overall care costs, healthcare use and readmissions while still providing quality care and improving the patient experience, according to a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Scientific and medical research with male authors is more likely to be self presented with positive words compared to research with first or last female authors, according to a new study published in The BMJ. That is, men are more likely than women to put a positive spin on their own work.

A CVS Health subsidiary, Omnicare, is facing a lawsuit from the Department of Justice over allegations the company defrauded government health programs by providing prescription drugs to thousands of long-term care facilities without proper prescriptions.

National watchdog organization The Leapfrog Group has announced its 2019 Top Hospitals awards, offering recognition to the highest quality hospitals in the nation.

E-cigarette use is linked to a higher association with respiratory diseases, one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Drugs commonly used to treat diabetes are being tested for unsafe levels of carcinogens by the FDA.

Americans are feeling slightly more optimistic about the U.S. healthcare system, according to the latest Gallup poll that found fewer described the system as having major problems.

Google fired four staffers for sharing sensitive information, some of whom were involved in recent protests over leadership, CNBC reported.

Hospitals provided about $12.8 million on average in uncompensated care in 2018, according to a new report from Definitive Healthcare.

Patient outcomes don’t differ significantly across high- or low-cost hospitals, according to a study from Harvard and Yale researchers published in JAMA Network Open.

Pharmaceutical, medical device and consumer goods company Johnson & Johnson rushed the testing of its baby powder after the FDA found asbestos in the product, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The improper payment rate in Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) fell to its lowest rate since 2010, according to CMS. However, there were still an estimated $28.9 billion in improper payments made in 2019, down $7 billion from 2017.