Quality

The Joint Commission has begun accepting comments on proposed revisions to National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG) requirements to “better identify and care” for patients who may be at risk of attempting suicide.

A larger practice doesn’t translate to better care for patients with multiple conditions, but having greater experience treating high-needs patients just might, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

Outcomes reported by the patient can bring actionable data to a provider and save money in the long run. Collecting that data, however, requires technology that patients can easily access and use.

Utilizing a multi-faceted antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs can not only help a facility combat antibiotic-resistant infections, but it can also lead to cost savings even when it’s not a focal point of those efforts.

A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report says physicians and hospitals failed to tell the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of safety issues related to power morcellators spreading undiagnosed cancer cells in women. Those devices aim to make tissue removal easier through small incisions and are most often used during hysterectomies or to remove benign uterine tumors. 

Participation in CMS’s Bundled Payment for Care Improvement Program (BPCI) didn’t lead to more lower extremity joint replacement procedures being performed, according to a study conducted by the Altarum Institute’s Center for Payment Innovation.

Lower inpatient admission rates at hospitals seemed to correlate to higher rates of unexpected deaths within seven days of discharge from an emergency department, according to a new study published in BMJ.

In California, 131 hospitals have gone at least five years without being inspection by public health officials, including 80 facilities that have reported significantly higher rates of hospital-acquired infections.

Elderly patients have better outcomes when hospitalized if cared for by a female physician than a male, according to a Harvard University study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. 

Beginning January 19, 2017, powdered medical gloves will be banned by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which cites “an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness or injury.”

Hospital-acquired infections and the deaths caused by them plunged between 2010 and 2015, according to a new report released by HHS.

Consumer Reports’ analysis on hospital-acquired infections found some “sobering" results when it came to teaching hospitals, with 31 making its list of low-performing facilities.