Quality

Participation in CMS’s Bundled Payment for Care Improvement Program (BPCI) didn’t lead to more lower extremity joint replacement procedures being performed, according to a study conducted by the Altarum Institute’s Center for Payment Innovation.

Lower inpatient admission rates at hospitals seemed to correlate to higher rates of unexpected deaths within seven days of discharge from an emergency department, according to a new study published in BMJ.

In California, 131 hospitals have gone at least five years without being inspection by public health officials, including 80 facilities that have reported significantly higher rates of hospital-acquired infections.

Elderly patients have better outcomes when hospitalized if cared for by a female physician than a male, according to a Harvard University study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. 

Beginning January 19, 2017, powdered medical gloves will be banned by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which cites “an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness or injury.”

Hospital-acquired infections and the deaths caused by them plunged between 2010 and 2015, according to a new report released by HHS.

Consumer Reports’ analysis on hospital-acquired infections found some “sobering" results when it came to teaching hospitals, with 31 making its list of low-performing facilities.

Patient care at Joint Commission-accredited hospitals improved in 2015, according to the group’s annual hospital safety and quality report.

CMS has announced new awards to a dozen regional organizations to create new initiatives or expand existing plans for improving quality for Medicare beneficiaries.

Patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies may wait for up to five days for a bed in an emergency department, according to a survey released by the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

Having more physicians employed by hospitals hasn’t provided benefits for patient care, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Almost every state, along with the District of Columbia, saw a decrease in Medicare 30-day hospital readmission rates between 2010 and 2015, falling by 8 percent nationally.